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Beaver Trapping and Removal

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Humanely Trapping and Relocating Beavers

Michigan’s most hard-working mammals, the beaver, can cause a lot of damage to your property. The lodges they build from branches, logs and compacted mud has benefits to the ecosystem; however, these shelters can turn into dams that cause flooding. Effective beaver control requires the consideration of both the benefits and risks of a nearby beaver population. Creature Control’s skilled technicians have the experience to identify areas of beaver activity and can humanely live trap them, upon which they can be safely removed and relocated.

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Beaver Characteristics

The North American beaver belongs to the Castor Canadensis species and is America’s largest rodent; third largest in the world, averaging 35 to 80 pounds and up to 3.5 feet in length. The South American Capybara and the Eurasian beaver are the only rodents larger than the North American beaver. When described, beavers are often given a geographical adjective such as Canadian beaver, American beaver, or North American beaver; however, they are all the same.

Beavers are semi-aquatic rodents and are most vulnerable to predators on land, so they remain in the water as much as possible; submerging themselves underwater for up to 15 minutes. Beavers are mostly nocturnal, foraging along the banks of rivers and streams. However, if there are no available rivers, beavers will take up residence in any body of water where the banks are suitable for their survival. Beavers are easy to identify because of their large, unique tails, which are flattened and shaped like the wide end of a canoe paddle. Their tail is used to assist with swimming and beavers also use it as a tool to flatten and pack mud to strengthen their shelter. Beavers use their front incisor teeth to gnaw down trees to hoard and collect large provisions of food for the winter.

Characteristics of Beaver Dens

Beavers have built a reputation for themselves as being anything but lazy, with common clichés such as “busy as a beaver”. The beaver builds its den by burrowing into the banks of the water’s edge and they further fortify it by topping it with branches and impacted mud. The entrances to these burrows are submerged in water and runs up at an angle so the living quarters are deep in the bank above the water level (see image below). If the dens are built too close to the surface of the ground, they may not have enough overhead support and could collapse or be dug up by predators. Typically, water banks are not suitable for this kind of excavating so beavers address this problem by mounding sticks over the den and piling mud on top of them. They stab the sharp end of gnawed branches into the ground in the water to hold it in place. This industrious trait that beavers have enable them to construct large, extravagant lodges surrounded by water, referred as “beaver dams” which provides shelter and food – the bark being their primary food source during the winter.

The largest beaver dam ever recorded was spotted by satellite in Alberta, Canada. The dam was 2,790 feet long and stretched over a half mile, twice as wide as the Hoover Dam.

Beaver dams can reach a tremendous size because a group of beavers, sometimes up to 20, will often form a colony and work together to build their lodge. These lodges acts as a dam raising the water level, which effectively floods out foraging areas allowing beavers to safely access food without ever having to leave the water. Beavers will often begin a dam by dropping a large tree at the river edge, usually stretching across to the opposite bank, which serves as the foundation. It also acts as a filter to catch floating debris in which the beaver will harvest up stream. Beavers work extremely fast and have been known to build dams overnight.

Beaver dams are incredibly beneficial for the local wildlife; they provide nesting quarters for various small animals and they create spawning areas for migratory trout and salmon. The dams filter out harmful sediments and substances that would otherwise destroy fish eggs. Interestingly, beaver dams do not form a barrier for fish migration as larger fish jump over lower portions of the dam and smaller fish find channels to swim through. The presence of beaver dams also increases the healthy migration of local fish populations and the abundance of wildlife that gathers to feed off of them. Dams do not stop the flow of a river; rather, they temporarily restrict the flow until the water builds up and spills over, under, or though portions of the dam.

Beaver Removal with Creature Control Get Rid of Beavers with Creature Control Getting Rid of Beavers with Creature Control

Problems with Beaver Dams & Relocating Beavers

Unfortunately, beavers and humans don’t always get along. In regions where beavers are prolific their dams threaten downstream property with droughts and flash floods. Upstream properties are susceptible to flooding that can destroy lawns, trees, and crops – even the complete destruction of homes, railways, and highways. Other damages include contaminated water supplies, alterations in wildlife habitats, drainage system impairments, chewed landscapes, and trees falling onto homes.

If you have a beaver on your property, Creature Control has the skilled trappers on hand that can apprehend and remove it. It is possible to trap beavers on land, but trapping them in water is much more practical. Whether on land or in the water, beaver trapping is a difficult process, requiring very thorough inspections and special equipment. It can be a laborious and time-consuming task, but one that Creature Control has been extremely successful at. Our skilled technicians have the experience to identify areas of beaver activity and live trap them underwater, upon which they can be safely removed and relocated. If you think you have a beaver, problem call Creature Control today!

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Scratching during the day may indicate the presence of a bat, but this is uncommon.

More common sources of scratching or clawing during the day is a squirrel or a yellowjacket hive in the drywall, if it is summer.

A scratching sound coming from the attic is a good indication of the presence of a bat. The scratching may be constant or intermittent and may occur at day or night, though with a bat, this scratching will usually be heard at night. This is the sounds of the claws on the bat's wings as it moves around.

It may also indicate the presence of mice, however. An inspection is necessary to more directly pinpoint the source of the sound.

Gnawing sounds during the day are almost always due to the presence of a rodent, such a mouse, squirrel, chipmunk, or sometimes a rat. Rodents are characterized by their large incisor teeth, which continually grow and must be worn down by constant gnawing. Rodents will gnaw on wires, insulation and anything else they can find in an attic. Many house fires due to electrical problems are caused by damaged wires due to squirrel gnawing.

If you are hearing gnawing or chewing sounds at night, it may indicate the presence of a raccoon. Usually this will be accompanied by other noises, such as heavy walking. If you do not hear this, it may be a flying squirrel or some other rodent.

A "rolling" sound is usually due to the presence of a red squirrel bringing in nuts or other debris and rolling it around up in the attic, as squirrels will use attics to hoard food. If you hear this sound during the day, it is certainly a red squirrel, since red squirrels are the only mammals that commonly get into attics that are active during the day (flying squirrels get into attics as well but they are nocturnal). The "rolling" sound associated with a squirrel is sometimes described as the sound of marbles rolling.

If it is not a squirrel, there's a possibility a rolling sound could be made by birds moving around in a tight space.

Rolling sounds at night can be caused by flying squirrels, which are nocturnal. It is made by the squirrel bringing nuts or other debris into the attic or wall.

Raccoons may also make a rolling sound, though this is less common.

Scampering or scurrying during the day is almost always attributable to a squirrel, as most other scurrying animals (such as mice) are nocturnal.

A scurrying or scampering sound at night is usually due to mice moving through the walls, ceiling, or along the floor.

Nocturnal flying squirrels may make this noise as well; peak periods of activity for flying squirrels are just before dawn and shortly after sunset. Their scurrying is light and fast.

Raccoons may also make this sort of noise, but with a raccoon it will be more of a "walking" sound, a bit heavier than a squirrel, and not as fast.

Heavy walking or crawling is a very unique sound that almost always indicates the presence of a raccoon, whether it occurs during the day or night.

Heavy walking or crawling is a very unique sound that almost always indicates the presence of a raccoon, whether it occurs during the day or night.

If you can clearly hear the sound of flapping during the day, it is definitely a bird.

If you hear flapping at night, it is either a trapped bird or a bat. Nuisance birds are generally not active at night, so if you hear flapping it may be a bird that has become trapped. The flapping of a bat's wings is very soft, almost like a dull whirring. If you hear a very faint, soft whirring, it may mean a bat is flying around nearby in the dark.

Crackling is a very particular noise that is generally made by a yellowjacket hive within the drywall of your home. yellowjackets will pick and gnaw on drywall and use the pieces to construct their hives. The sound of this gnawing is often described as a crackling; it sounds a lot like Rice Krispies popping. If you hear this, it means the yellowjackets are close to gnawing through the dry wall. It is not as common at night, but certainly can happen then as well if the hive is big enough.

Crackling is a very particular noise that is generally made by the presence of a yellowjacket hive within the drywall of your home. yellowjackets will pick and gnaw on drywall and use the pieces to construct their hives. The sound of this gnawing is often described as a crackling; it sounds a lot like Rice Krispies popping. If you hear this, it means the yellowjackets are close to gnawing through the dry wall.

A sound of chirping or chattering usually means there are baby animals present. What species depends on the season, but it is very common for baby squirrels, raccoons, or birds (especially chimney swifts) to make these noises. Please contact Creature Control for a more thorough diagnosis.

A sound of chirping or chattering usually means there are baby animals present. What species depends on the season, but it is very common for baby squirrels, raccoons, or birds (especially chimney swifts) to make these noises. Please contact Creature Control for a more thorough diagnosis.

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