Author: creaturecontrol

Bees/Stinging-Insect Guide

  As the weather warms up, more and more insects will start to become active. Of the various subspecies that you might see around your home, bees and stinging insects can be the most troubling to spot as they probe high up within the eaves and soffits. General activity, along with pestering you and your guests enjoying the outdoors, is a sign that you should consider getting your home treated to prevent nest-building and reduce exposure. However, there is more than one type of stinging insect, thus various kinds of treatments should take place. At Creature Control, we first determine what you are dealing with before approaching a solution. This article helps explain the basic differences among bees and other stinging insects. Carpenter Bees are large, black, and usually cluster in small groups in and around wooden soffits, decks, and pillars. They can be glossy in some areas of their…

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Pesky, Invasive Birds and Spring Insects

Migrating Starlings Starlings have returned from migration and are probing and locating nesting sites. Common places for them to roost are eave returns, bathroom fan vent lines, and oven hoods. These birds are very messy nesters and can have up to 2 broods—one in the spring and one in the early summer. If given the opportunity, they make large nests, and their offspring are noisy, among other issues such as carrying mites and ticks, feces buildup, nest debris and smell, and deceased birds. Besides the constant racket, a starling invasion can clog or even destroy your vent lines. Other common pesty birds are English sparrows, which can have up to five clutches per nesting season. Though they are not as messy or destructive as a starling, they too can carry mites and ticks and can create a disturbance with their nest debris and feces while they utilize voids and ledges of…

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Understanding Ground Trapping

It’s now March, which means that the sap has begun to run in the maples, the squirrels can be heard chattering in the trees, and the intermittent snow of a Michigan winter is replaced with showers of rain. The smell of spring in the air may be something else, perhaps the musky scent of a skunk family as they wander your yard throughout the night. They’re not the only mammals to become active this time of year. From now until fall, you can have visitors from groundhogs, raccoons, opossums, rabbits, and sometimes even foxes, depending on where you live. While none of these animals are really all that dangerous to humans, it can be disconcerting to see them roaming in “your” yard, especially if you have domesticated animals. Ground trapping, the entrapment and removal of wildlife pests at ground level (opposed to those in an attic or other elevated space,)…

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Use Common Scents with These Pests

Memorable and rightly feared for that particular, pungent odor (which humans can detect 3.5 miles downwind!), skunks are recognizable by their black and white fur. Some boast, instead, a brown or gray or cream-colored coat, but all are similar enough to curl the end of your hair if you meet one unexpectedly on an evening stroll. Their omnivorous diet of insects and some lesser pests may make them valuable to your area. Unfortunately, the skunk is one of four wild animals known to be a primary carrier of the rabies virus (others being: bats, raccoons, and foxes), so a sizeable distance is desired. While that infamous scent can stick to a person, clothing, a dog, or a car, the silver lining is that a skunk utilizes it only when they —or their kits, as the babies are called— are threatened. This means that as soon as you spot one of…

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Why You Suck at Insect Control

Most people know that there are some pests that they just can’t control by themselves, such as mosquitos or bedbugs. Mosquitoes don’t necessarily breed on your property, and the only good way to control them is with a fog treatment. On the opposite end of control, bedbugs are off-putting and resistant enough to over-the-counter remedies that most people end up calling a professional right away (which is the right decision).  But what about insects that many people try and treat without a second thought, such as wasps, ants, or stinkbugs?  Every grocery store carries a line of insecticides, or even traps, all claiming to “kill on contact,” or “kills *given pest* instantly,” but when used by the average consumer, they often do little to nothing to stem the tide of insects. What is the difference between generally available products and those that our technicians use to control pest issues? The…

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Raccoons are a Nuisance

Raccoons are one of the most destructive and mischievous pests, making them a massive headache for homeowners. Raccoons are not only damaging but also incredibly intelligent. They can open bottles, canisters, and other closed items, burrow under decks, nest in attics and chimneys, destroy landscaping, and more. Raccoons can cause an immense number of issues in a short time. Creature Control knows how to effectively remove these pests from your home or business. Don’t try to get rid of them on your own – we can help! Noisy and Invasive Pests Think you’re safe from raccoon invasions? Think again! Raccoons can fit into holes as small as 4.5 inches, thanks to their narrow hips. Once inside your home or business, raccoons will scurry around making a huge mess, while they seek and create a shelter from the cold elements. They make smudge marks and footprints on downspouts, pillars, trees, gutters,…

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Evicting Long-Term Guests

There’s a good chance that at some point during the winter, you’ve experienced an infestation of insects. This can be unexpected; after all, bugs should be dead from the freezing temperatures here in Michigan. The fact is, our homes are often where colonies of insects overwinter to survive the cold, harsh elements. Typically, insects will overwinter as adults, entering homes through tiny cracks, crevices, ductwork, or vents. They’ll often end up in groups or clusters in wall voids or attic spaces near heat and ventilation sources, usually remaining there until spring. Sometimes, though, any increase in temperature may fool the insects into movement. Thus, you may find them in the living spaces of your home. Common finds are stinkbugs, boxelder bugs, Asian Lady beetles, and cluster flies. Oddly enough, the insects rarely use this time to reproduce; instead, they stay relatively stagnant unless they wake up. Since standard contact-based pesticides…

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Histoplasmosis & Bat Guano

When considering the potential dangers of bats, most people will know about the possibility that the flying rodents carry rabies, which is undoubtedly a valid concern. There’s no reason to downplay that risk because it’s certainly real, but a far more likely issue (statistically speaking) is contracting Histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis is a disease that generally affects the lungs and can be contracted through exposure to bat feces, commonly known as guano. Large amounts of guano left to dry are usually a result of a successful bat eviction that did not involve any cleanup or a failed cleanup. Exposure usually comes from disturbing guano that has dried out, as the disease comes from fungal spores that infect the bats themselves and are present in the guano. Symptoms of Histoplasmosis include aches, chest tightness, fevers, chills, and in chronic cases, bloody coughs. It is treatable, but if left to spread outside the lungs,…

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Effective Mouse Control

As winter approaches and the temperature outside drops, we humans like to cozy up inside our nice, warm houses. Unfortunately, so do pests such as mice, squirrels, and raccoons. In Michigan, mice are certainly our biggest wintertime pest concern. Unlike other mammals, a mouse will not hibernate, and mice colonies will remain active throughout the winter season. In fact, mouse activity may even increase during the colder weather because those living nearby, in fields, etc., will be drawn inside your home as they seek warm shelter. Mice have an incredible sense of smell, and they are small enough to squeeze through a hole the size of a dime. They are nocturnal and are generally not seen during the day. A sure sign of a rodent infestation is mouse droppings, dirty/grease smudges along baseboards, a distinctive ammonia-like odor (strong urine smell), damage caused by their constant gnawing, nests made from shredded…

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Understanding Recurring Services

Many of our customers call us out to deal with raccoons, bats, or squirrels: issues that are usually solved within a few weeks (depending on the season) and with only a few visits from one of our technicians.  Pest issues, however (especially mice), nearly always require more maintenance to keep control over the population.  This can seem discouraging to those who just want their problem solved, but we have a nearly painless method of maintaining control over small rodents.  Therefore, we often recommend our Recurring Services program. Typically, a mouse service starts with an initial inspection. The technician will write up an estimate for a rodenticide application, determine the number of exterior and garage bait stations (containing rodenticide) required, and the seal work to be done.  The rodenticide treatment and the bait stations can usually be done at the same visit, and two weeks later, the technician will return to…

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